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OFFICE BUILDING

Drafting l Design l Planning l Permits

 

CATEGORY

OFFICE BUILDING

This is a concrete til-up building and it is a type of construction that can save the client money. It is one of the easiest to build and manipulate for design by adding finish materials. eifs, or score lines you can bring a different look and style.

 

Some color contrast like in any design will also help liven the building up and we went with red canopies over some of the windows used by office spaces to match the CitiBanks' logo and keep the direct sunlight thus keeping the temperature at a low. We also designed some metal canopies to go above some windows in the front and side to give it some strong character.

Aluminum storefront windows were used in the design to bring natural light into the facility and for that modern look.

The landscape was kept at a minimal placing colorful shrubs and plants around the exterior of the building and near windows.

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Designed while at C+M Architecture Inc.

Zadeh Properties | Valencia, CA

New CitiBank Branch Office

 

OFFICE SPACE PLANNING

The main purpose of an office environment is to support its occupants in performing their job, preferably at minimum cost and to maximum satisfaction. With different people performing different tasks and activities, however, it is not always easy to select the right office spaces.

 

To aid decision-making in workplace and office design, one can distinguish three different types of office spaces: workspaces, meeting spaces and support spaces. For new, or developing businesses, remote satellite offices and project rooms are recommended.

 

Serviced Offices can provide a simple solution and provide all of the former types of space.

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WorkSpaces

Workspaces in an office are typically used for conventional office activities such as reading, writing and computer work. There are nine generic types of workspace, each supporting different activities.

 

Open office - An open workspace for more than ten people, suitable for activities which demand frequent communication or routine activities which need relatively little concentration

Team space - A semi-enclosed workspace for two to eight people; suitable for teamwork which demands frequent internal communication and a medium level of concentration

Cubicle - A semi-enclosed workspace for one person, suitable for activities which demand medium concentration and medium interaction

Private office - An enclosed workspace for one person, suitable for activities which are confidential, demand a lot of concentration or include many small meetings

Shared office - An enclosed workspace for two or three people, suitable for semi-concentrated work and collaborative work in small groups

Team room - An enclosed workspace for four to ten people; suitable for teamwork which may be confidential and demands frequent internal communication

Study booth - An enclosed workspace for one person; suitable for short-term activities which demand concentration or confidentiality

Work lounge - A lounge-like workspace for two to six people; suitable for short-term activities which demand collaboration and/or allow impromptu interaction

Touch down - An open workspace for one person; suitable for short-term activities which require little concentration and low interaction

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Meeting Spaces

Meeting spaces in an office are typically used interactive processes, be it quick conversations or intensive brainstorms. There are six generic types of meeting space, each supporting different activities.

Small meeting room - An enclosed meeting space for two to four persons, suitable for both formal and informal interaction

Large meeting room - An enclosed meeting space for five to twelve people, suitable for formal interaction

Small meeting space - An open or semi-open meeting space for two to four persons; suitable for short, informal interaction

Large meeting space - An open or semi-open meeting space for five to twelve people; suitable for short, informal interaction

Brainstorm room - An enclosed meeting space for five to twelve persons; suitable for brainstorming sessions and workshops

Meeting point - An open meeting point for two to four persons; suitable for ad hoc, informal meetings

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Support Spaces

Support spaces in an office are typically used for secondary activities such as filing documents or taking a break. There are twelve generic types of support space, each supporting different activities.

Filing space - An open or enclosed support space for the storage of frequently used files and documents

Storage space - An open or enclosed support space for the storage of commonly used office supplies

Print and copy area - An open or enclosed support space with facilities for printing, scanning, and copying

Mail area - An open or semi-open support space where employees can pick up or deliver their personal mail

Pantry area - An open or enclosed support space where people can get coffee and tea as well as soft drinks and snacks

Break area - A semi-open or enclosed support space where employees can take a break from their work

Locker area - An open or semi-open support space where employees can store their personal belongings

Smoking room - An enclosed support space where employees can smoke a cigarette

Library - A semi-open or enclosed support space for the reading of books, journals, and magazines

Games room - An enclosed support space where employees can play games (e.g. computer games, pool, darts)

Waiting area - An open or semi-open support space where visitors can be received and can wait for their appointment

Circulation space - Support space which is required for circulation on office floors, linking all major functions

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Not all office buildings are created equal – which is why a general classification system exists to categorize them by age, amenities, aesthetics, and general infrastructure. Commercial real estate brokers use these classes to prepare market data and justify the cost of leases within the building.

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Class A

The highest-quality office spaces on the market are considered Class A. Generally speaking, these spaces are newly constructed and have been outfitted with top-of-the-line fixtures, amenities, and HVAC and technological systems. Class A buildings are aesthetically pleasing and have a notable presence in high-visibility locations, such as a city's central business district, notes the Building Owners and Managers Association International (BOMA). These spaces are normally maintained by reputable property management companies that keep them looking impeccable.

Height is another common characteristic of Class A buildings. Many high-rises fall into this category; spaces inside these structures tend to have higher ceilings as well. A large central lobby is also typical of buildings in this category.

Class A rental rates are typically higher than the city’s average rents, and tenant concessions, such as reduced fees or consent to sublease, are rare because the premier space is competitively sought after. Offices in these buildings are often popular among high-profile, white-collar companies, such as financial institutions and law firms.

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Class B

Class B properties are considered decent as far as office spaces go. These buildings usually don’t have the same high-quality fixtures, architectural details, and impressive lobbies as Class A spaces, but they are generally nice structures with fully functional facilities.

 

Their locations, building systems, and property managers are described as average to above average. Therefore, Class B office space tends to command "average" market rent. The majority of Class B buildings are fewer than four stories tall and are often found in the suburbs or on the edge of large financial districts.

Another factor that separates Class A and B buildings: age. Class B buildings are typically older than Class A buildings and may be experiencing some deterioration. Some buildings start out with a Class A rating but are downgraded after 10 years, or once signs of wear-and-tear become apparent.

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Class C

Class C commercial office spaces are the poorest-quality structures on the market. They tend to be located in the least desirable areas of cities and are usually in need of major repairs or a complete renovation. The need for significant repairs or upgrades is typically the result of the building's age, as Class C properties are generally more than 20 years old.

Some Class C properties remain occupied, commanding lower rental rates and attracting tenants with smaller operations that cannot afford nicer spaces or that do not need their businesses to be located in centralized hubs. Other Class C buildings are sold as rehabilitation opportunities. With some improvements and repairs, a Class C building can be upgraded to Class B, though it is unlikely to ever achieve Class A status, due to its location and age.

Of course, pricing office space is not an exact science; a variety of factors go into it, from the state of the local real estate market to the amenities offered by the building. For that reason, official as they sound, these classifications are somewhat subjective—something to bear in mind in lease negotiations.

 

Sand Canyon Medical Park | Sand Canyon, CA

4 Office Building and Site Planning

This 22,800 office and warehouse building required a cost-conscious design to be realized. A tight construction budget was met by designing a tilt-up concrete panel structure. To make this building appeal to the market place and still realize an optimum construction budget, we utilized bold color, minimal finish materials, and details. The building entrances were emphasized through the use of glass, colorful decorative canopies, and bold form.

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Designed while at C+M Architecture Inc.